What do self-reported, objective, measures of health measure?
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What do self-reported, objective, measures of health measure?

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Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Health surveys -- Statistical methods.,
  • Health status indicators.,
  • Health attitudes.,
  • Medical records.,
  • Labor supply.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementMichael Baker, Mark Stabile, Catherine Deri.
SeriesNBER working paper series -- no. 8419, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research) -- working paper no. 8419.
ContributionsStabile, Mark., Deri, Catherine., National Bureau of Economic Research.
The Physical Object
Pagination50 p. :
Number of Pages50
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL22425608M

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Get this from a library! What do self-reported, objective, measures of health measure?. [Michael Baker; Mark Stabile; Catherine Deri; National Bureau of Economic Research.] -- Abstract: Survey reports of the incidence of chronic conditions are considered by many researchers to be more objective, and thus preferable, measures of unobserved health status than self-assessed. Downloadable! Economists rely heavily on self-reported measures of health status to examine the relationship between income and health. In this paper we directly compare survey responses to a self-reported measure of health that is commonly available in nationally-representative individual and household surveys, with objective measures of the same health condition. The costs and difficulties associated with assessing the health of a population have led to an ongoing search for indicators of health status that can be readily collected from large numbers of individuals with minimal expenditure of resources, including time, money, training, and logistics. Measuring health can be demanding in terms of interviewer time and skill, respondent Cited by: Comparing Subjective and Objective Measures of Health: Evidence from Hypertension for the Income/Health Gradient* Economists rely heavily on self-reported measures of health status to examine the relationship between income and health. .

What Do Self-Reported, Objective, Measures of Health Measure? Michael Baker Mark Stabile Catherine Deri ABSTRACT Survey reports of the incidence of chronic conditions are considered by many researchers to be more objective, and thus preferable, measures of unobserved health status than self-assessed measures of global well being. The indicators examined in this study are. self-reported health (SRH), whereby respondents are asked to classify their current health status as good, fair, or poor;. an index based on self-reported activities of daily living;. an index of self-reported major acute and chronic morbidity conditions;. an index of physical disability based on observed activities of daily living; and. On disaggregating life expectancy and self-reported illness data by sexes, it was revealed that self-reported illness for males was a better measure for objective health than for females. The literature revealed that subjective indexes of health is a good measure if people are asked to report on their health current and not over any long period Cited by: objective measures as instruments for self reported health may retr ieve less biased estimates of the effects of health on the labour market outcome of interest, but may lead to biased estimates of the parameters of any other explanatory variables that are themselves determinants of self -reported health.

• Performance-Based Measures o What is the patient’s actual level of function? Outcome Measures • Self-Report vs. Performance-Based Measures o Low to moderate agreement between measures o Salen showed a moderate correlation (r) between patient’s self-reported difficulty in performing tasks and observer assessmentFile Size: KB. When self reported measures are used health seems to playa larger role and economic factors a smaller one than when more objective measures are used" While most authors have interpreted these results as an indication of the biases inherent in using self-reported measures, there are reasons to be suspicious of estimates based on more objective. Is the HILK a Useful Complementary Measure of HIL? Objective of this study: 1. Examining HILK‘s reliability, validity, and usefulness A higher level of HIL should be associated with higher levels of a) self-reported health information literacy (EHIL) b) . Our results suggest that there is limited evidence of a relationship between self-reported and objective measures of fiscal condition. Discover the world's research 17+ million members.